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Understanding Form 1095-C, Employer-Provided Health Insurance Offer and Coverage

Employers with 50 or more full-time employees, including full-time equivalent employees, in the previous year use Form 1095-C, Employer-Provided Health Insurance Offer and Coverage, to report the information required about offers of health coverage and enrollment in health coverage for their employees. Form 1095-C is used to report information about each employee.

Employers that offer employer-sponsored self-insured coverage also use Form 1095-C to report information to the IRS and to employees about individuals who have minimum essential coverage under the employer plan and therefore are not liable for the individual shared responsibility payment for the months that they are covered under the plan. An employer must furnish a Form 1095-C to each of its full-time employees by January 31 of the year following the year to which the Form 1095-C relates.

Daemen Launches New Certificate in Executive Leadership

Daemen Launches New Certificate in Executive Leadership

AMHERST, N.Y. – Daemen College will launch in January a new advanced certificate program in executive leadership and change (ELC), which is designed to prepare working professionals for leadership positions in business, health professions, higher education, and nonprofit organizations.

“This new advanced certificate program will offer students a great opportunity to develop essential leadership skills and build competencies in areas that will be beneficial to career advancement,” said Dr. John S. Frederick, executive director of the Daemen Center for Executive Leadership and Change. “With this advanced training, students will be better positioned to take on leadership roles and be more marketable in the workplace.”

Employer Shared Responsibility Payment

How Coverage You Offer (or Don’t Offer) May Mean an Employer Shared Responsibility Payment for Your Organization

Under the Affordable Care Act, certain employers, based on workforce size – called applicable large employers – are subject to the employer shared responsibility provisions. The vast majority of employers fall below the workforce size threshold and, therefore, are not subject to the employer shared responsibility provisions.

If you are an employer that is subject to the employer shared responsibility provisions, you may choose either to offer affordable minimum essential coverage that provides minimum value to your full-time employees and their dependents, or to potentially owe an employer shared responsibility payment to the IRS. Many employers already offer coverage that is sufficient to avoid owing a payment.

The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015

On November 2, 2015, President Obama signed into law the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015, legislation that raises the federal debt limit and establishes the framework for a two-year budget deal. The legislation, needed to avoid an impending default on U.S. debt, also contains multiple unrelated provisions, including an elimination of two Social Security retirement benefit claiming strategies and a provision to prevent a significant increase in Medicare Part B premiums for some.

Social Security

College Costs for 2015/2016 and New FAFSA Timeline for 2017/2018

Every year the College Board releases its annual Trends in College Pricing report that highlights current college costs and trends. While costs can vary significantly depending on the region and college, the College Board publishes average cost figures, which are based on its survey of nearly 4,000 colleges across the country.

Following are cost highlights for the 2015/2016 academic year. Total average cost figures include tuition and fees, room and board, and a sum for books, transportation, and personal expenses. Together, these expenditures are officially referred to by colleges as the "total cost of attendance."

What do I need to do to create a will?

A will is a legal document that is generally used to describe how you want your estate to be distributed after your death. It might also be used to name an executor for your estate or a guardian for your minor children. It is generally a good practice to name backup beneficiaries, executors, and guardians just in case they are needed. Even though it's not a legal requirement, a will should generally be drafted by an attorney.

In order to make a will, you must be of legal age (18 in most states). You must also understand what property you own, who the family members or friends it would seem natural to leave property to are, and who gets what under your will.

How do I change or revoke a will?

Your will does not take effect until you die. You can create a new will or revoke or amend an existing will up until your death.

A will remains valid until properly revoked or superseded. Revoking your will must be done very carefully. Most state laws require that the will be revoked by a subsequent instrument (a new will) or by a physical act (e.g., destroying or defacing it). This means the will must either be burned, torn, or canceled with the intent to revoke. You might, for example, write REVOKED across the will and sign and date the revocation.